Go ahead. Do a doodle. It’s good for you.

iPhone background doodle by Ben Britten on Flickr. Licensed via Creative Commons.

iPhone background doodle by Ben Britten on Flickr. Licensed via Creative Commons.

There was a time when if you drew in the side margins of meeting agendas you’d be frowned at. But not any more. Meeting agendas and minutes are now mostly digital (thankfully) and people are realizing the benefits of doodling.

The Wall Street Journal reports that recent research in neuroscience, psychology and design shows that doodling can help people stay focused, grasp new concepts and even retain information.

“A blank page also can serve as an extended playing field for the brain, allowing people to revise and improve on creative thoughts and ideas,” writes Sue Shellenbarger, who adds: “Doodles are spontaneous marks that can take many forms, from abstract patterns or designs to images of objects, landscapes, people or faces. Some people doodle by retracing words or letters, but doodling doesn’t include note-taking.”

Read the full story in the Wall Street Journal. And then pull out your pencil and start doodling.

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